CPS Blog

The Center for Political Studies (CPS) is a non-partisan research center. Posts are not endorsements.

How Do White Churches Talk about Racism?

How Do White Churches Talk about Racism?

After the murders of George Floyd and Breanna Taylor by the police in 2020, the United States witnessed what was arguably the largest protest movement in that nation's history. Millions of Americans marched in protest of racist police violence and in pursuit of...

Rising inequality isn’t driving mass public support for redistribution: Charlotte Cavaillé’s ‘Fair Enough? explains why not.

Rising inequality isn’t driving mass public support for redistribution: Charlotte Cavaillé’s ‘Fair Enough? explains why not.

In the past, excessive economic inequality has ended… badly. As Charlotte Cavaillé points out in her new book that studies the public’s reaction to rising inequality, “only mass warfare, a state collapse, or catastrophic plagues have significantly altered the...

CLEA Provides Student Opportunities for Impact and Growth

CLEA Provides Student Opportunities for Impact and Growth

Housed in the Center for Political Studies at the Institute for Social Research, The Constituency-Level Elections Archive (CLEA) is a repository of detailed results from lower and upper house elections from around the world. The project provides opportunities for students to be involved at all stages of the data collection process, providing a valuable training experience. 

Does Disability Shape Political Identity?

Joshua Thorp finds that disability is indeed an important dimension of political identity for many disabled Americans. While disabled Americans do not appear mobilized along party lines, a sense of belonging to the disability community is associated with ideological liberalism and support for a range of social and redistributive policies. 

How Voter Loyalties Change

Partisanship is sticky. People tend to vote like their parents and to maintain their partisan leanings over time. But to understand partisanship, we need a model that can explain why people change party loyalties when they do. This is what Ken Kollman and John E. Jackson of the University of Michigan Center for Political Studies (CPS) provide in Dynamic Partisanship: How and Why Voter Loyalties Change.

Latinos for Trump in 2020

Latinos continue to surprise with their sustained and increased support for former President Trump, a candidate who often seems an unlikely advocate for the group. After numerous episodes during his campaign for president and time in office espousing what was seen as anti-Latino and anti-immigrant rhetoric and policies, it is puzzling to many that almost one in three Latinos voted for him during the 2020 presidential election. So why did Latinos support Trump in 2020?

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